Therapeutic Approaches

EP Therapeutic Approaches

As a group of applied psychologists with additional interests and advanced therapeutic competencies, our practice focus is underpinned by a wide range of therapeutic orientations, approaches and interventions that vary in frequency, intensity and specificity to different audiences.

Therapeutic Packages

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Approaches to support verbal primary and secondary aged pupils with problem behaviour

Dr Frances Parker

Cognitive behaviour therapy is an evidence-based intervention based on how thoughts and feelings can affect behaviour in helpful and unhelpful ways.

Therapeutic approaches using this framework can help children and young people develop cognitive problem-solving skills to use in everyday situations.

The individual or group sessions would be aimed at pupils who argue with peers and staff underpinned by limited reasoning and defensive feelings. A member of staff (such as a learning mentor) should be involved with the group to learn about CBT approaches and to support the pupils.

Staff CPD

Introduction to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Approaches to enable staff delivery of core techniques.

Group & Individual Therapy

The sessions aim to address the following areas and pupils should be able to use the techniques independently by the end of the intervention. A member of staff (such as a learning mentor) should be involved with the group to learn about CBT approaches and to support the pupils.

  • Psycho-educational teaching on cognitive behavioural framework and the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviour
  • Labelling, recognising and reframing cognitive distortions (types of unhelpful thoughts)
  • Recognising and reframing , ‘hot thoughts’
  • Psycho-educational teaching about angry versus assertive behaviours
  • Relaxation techniques

Body image and eating disorders: Beating Body Battles, Nourishing Minds

Dr Rathika Marsh & Kirsty Uytendhal

Statistics show that 1.6 million people in the UK are affected by an eating disorder and many more struggle with body image issues. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rates among psychiatric disorders with Anorexia Nervosa having the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder in adolescence.

On average, eating disorders first develop at around the age of 16 to 17 and without young people developing effective coping strategies there is the risk of this continuing into adulthood. With the dominating impact of social media, there are so many more negative messages and influences that our children and young people are faced with from a young age.

Promoting positive emotional wellbeing at an individual, group and whole school or service level can promote much healthier attitudes towards sense of self, body image and coping.

Staff CPD

  • Building awareness of young people and body image issues including Eating Disorders (ED).
  • Looking at signs and triggers.
  • Looking at definitions of ED.
  • Skilling staff and parents in building resilience in young people.
  • Raising awareness of different therapeutic techniques, such as mindfulness, creative arts and narrative therapy.
  • Raising awareness of thought patterns and associated behaviours (unhealthy coping strategies that young people may adopt).

Group & Individual level

Supporting schools to develop sessions around promoting positive wellbeing, mental health and coping strategies. Supporting staff and parents through consultation around effectively supporting individual young people with these types of difficulties.

Social Media

Dr Lynne Wadsworth

Growing up with the presence of social media is a relatively new phenomenon and research suggests it is having a striking impact on children and young people.

  • British teenagers spend 27 hours a week online (Ofcom 2015)
  • People are spending twice as much time online compared to 10 years ago with the biggest increase among young adults (16- 24) (Ofcom, 2015)

Statistics from April 2013 – March 2014 regarding children’s contact with ChildLine showed that there has been an:

  • 87% increase in number of counselling sessions about on-line bullying
  • 168% increase in counselling sessions related to online sexual abuse
  • 34% increase in young people talking to ChildLine about mental health issues (this area is seeing the largest year on year growth).

Staff CPD

  • Providing a psychological perspective on the use of social media
  • Exploring the impact of social media with reference to research
  • Looking at what schools can do to promote resiliency around social media.

Group & Individual level

Supporting schools to develop sessions around promoting positive wellbeing, mental health and coping strategies. Supporting staff and parents through consultation around effectively supporting individual young people with these types of difficulties.

Examination anxiety

Dr Frances Parker

Problems with anxiety are really common and as many as 1 in 6 young people will experience an anxiety problem at some point in their lives. Anxiety is the feeling of fear or panic. Exam anxiety is becomingly increasingly recognised as impacting on performance and educational outcomes.

  • cognitive: the negative thoughts and depreciating self-statements that occur during assessments (e.g. ‘If I fail this exam my whole life is a failure’) and the performance- inhibiting difficulties that may arise from anxiety (e.g. recalling facts and difficulty in reading and understanding questions);
  • affective: the person’s appraisal of their physiological state (such as tension, tight muscles and trembling);
  • behavioural: poor study skills, avoidance and procrastination of work

Staff CPD

Staff CPD to build capacity to group and individual casework level

Group & Individual Therapy

Group and individual sessions with young person using CBA (cognitive behavioural approaches)


These packages can be offered at a whole school level through CPD or twilight sessions, delivered with groups of children and young people, or with individuals. 

We are able to support children and young people who experience a variety of life challenges including bereavement, disordered eating, anxiety, depression, self-harm, examination stress, anger issues, low self-esteem, gender identity, poor social problem-solving and issues associated with social media.

Teaching staff equally fall within our realm / circle of support: Concerns about stress and professional burn-out, the impact of constant educational changes, time / self-organization and management, and supervision constitute areas of potential support.

We also deliver training to school staff, based on their unique situational and professional needs.


For more information about any of our Educational Psychology services, contact us online or call Jacqueline Graham on 0844 967 6810.

GET IN TOUCH